World Cup 2018: What Contractors Can Learn

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The flags have been taken down, the face paint has been scrubbed off and the gentle hum of ‘It’s Coming Home’ has finally subsided. Surprisingly, however, positive memories of the 2018 World Cup still linger for England supporters.

But what can contractors learn from the England team’s performance since the 16th June? A tenuous link, you may think, but bear with us – for contractors, there may be more to take away from this World Cup than fourth place…

A support system is invaluable

It’s fair to say that over the years, the England football team hasn’t had the most positive response from the supporters at home. With early exits from national tournaments and egos getting in the way of the game, it’s hardly surprising. However, with Gareth Southgate’s charm and the sheer determination of the young team, the support from England football fans hit rocket levels during the 2018 tournament. In fact, over 40% of the UK population tuned in to support the team during the semi-finals.

Similarly, when you decide to work for yourself, having the support from family, friends and even ex-colleagues can be invaluable.

Don’t be afraid of change

Deciding to leave a number of England’s senior players at home may have raised eyebrows with a few pundits, however Southgate stuck by his choice to take a fresh team with him to Russia. This shake up of the team was in fact a great tactic, without which, England may not have fared as well.

One of the best things about being self-employed is that you can vary which contracts you work on, however it can be easy to get into a rut of accepting similar contracts. If this happens, switching things up can be a great opportunity to stretch your skillset, meet new people and re-invigorate your love of contracting.

Have belief in yourself

After years of disappointment, it’s fair to say that the belief from the fans at home for England to finally win the World Cup may not have been the highest. However, Gareth Southgate’s belief in his team and himself saw England reach the semi-finals of the world cup for the first time since 1990.

Similar to contracting – if you don’t believe in yourself, the work you produce and the value you can add to a company – why would anyone else?

Experience isn’t everything

You may think that just because you’ve only been in your chosen career path that contracting isn’t for you, however there’s a lot to be said for passion, knowledge and skill.

The average age of the England football team was 26, making them the youngest team at the 2018 World Cup. Despite this perceived lack of experience, they successfully flew into the semi-finals. Proof that having a few years less experience doesn’t mean you’ll be any less successful.

It’s okay to play by the rules

Whilst some teams in the World Cup seemed to think that they were in the WWF, our lads kept their heads in the right game. Meaning penalties against them were at a minimum. For other teams, VAR checks were rife and yellow cards were being shown left-right and centre.

Being able to break free from the shackles of the rules and regulations of the workplace can be a key factor in many people becoming contractors however, working for yourself also has a set of rules that it’s best to adhere to. Ensuring you stay within the guidelines set out by HMRC (in particular, IR35) means that you can enjoy your contracting career free from penalties and additional checks from HMRC.

How can Parasol help?

We may not be able to get you over to Qatar in 2022 but we can provide you with a compliant umbrella solution to ensure you (or your clients) are getting paid.

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